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dc.contributor.authorAvershina, Ekaterina
dc.contributor.authorStorrø, Ola
dc.contributor.authorØien, Torbjørn
dc.contributor.authorJohnsen, Roar
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Robert
dc.contributor.authorEgeland, Thore
dc.contributor.authorRudi, Knut
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-03T09:56:03Z
dc.date.available2014-02-03T09:56:03Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationAvershina, Ekaterina, Storrø, Ola, Øien, Torbjørn, Johnsen, Roar, Wilson, Robert, Egeland, Thore, & Rudi, Knut. (2013). Bifidobacterial Succession and Correlation Networks in a Large Unselected Cohort of Mothers and Their Children. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 79(2), 497-507. doi: http://dx.doi.org10.1128/AEM.02359-12no_NO
dc.identifier.issn0099-2240
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/134610
dc.descriptionFagfellevurdert artikkel, publisert i Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2013.no_NO
dc.description.abstractBifidobacteria are a major microbial component of infant gut microbiota, which is believed to promote health benefits for the host and stimulate maturation of the immune system. Despite their perceived importance, very little is known about the natural development of and possible correlations between bifidobacteria in human populations. To address this knowledge gap, we analyzed stool samples from a randomly selected healthy cohort of 87 infants and their mothers with>90% of vaginal delivery and nearly 100% breast-feeding at 4 months. Fecal material was sampled during pregnancy, at 3 and 10 days, at 4 months, and at 1 and 2 years after birth. Stool samples were predicted to be rich in the species Bifidobacterium adolescentis, B. bifidum, B. den- tium, B. breve, and B. longum. Due to high variation, we did not identify a clear age-related structure at the individual level. Within the population as a whole, however, there were clear age-related successions. Negative correlations between the B. longum group and B. adolescentis were detected in adults and in 1- and 2-year-old children, whereas negative correlations between B. longum and B. breve were characteristic for newborns and 4-month-old infants. The highly structured age-related development of and correlation networks between bifidobacterial species during the first 2 years of life mirrors their different or competing nutritional requirements, which in turn may be associated with specific biological functions in the development of healthy gut.no_NO
dc.language.isoengno_NO
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyno_NO
dc.subjectbifidobacteriano_NO
dc.subjectcohortno_NO
dc.subjectdevelopmentno_NO
dc.subjectgut microbiotano_NO
dc.subjectmother and childno_NO
dc.titleBifidobacterial Succession and Correlation Networks in a Large Unselected Cohort of Mothers and Their Childrenno_NO
dc.typeJournal articleno_NO
dc.typePeer reviewedno_NO
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Mathematics and natural science: 400::Basic biosciences: 470::General microbiology: 472no_NO
dc.source.pagenumber497-507no_NO
dc.source.volume79no_NO
dc.source.journalApplied and Environmental Microbiologyno_NO
dc.source.issue2no_NO
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org10.1128/AEM.02359-12


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