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dc.contributor.authorEriksen, Ane
dc.contributor.authorWabakken, Petter
dc.contributor.authorZimmermann, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorAndreassen, Harry Peter
dc.contributor.authorArnemo, Jon Martin
dc.contributor.authorGundersen, Hege
dc.contributor.authorLiberg, Olof
dc.contributor.authorLinnell, John
dc.contributor.authorMilner, Jos M.
dc.contributor.authorPedersen, Hans Christian
dc.contributor.authorSand, Håkan
dc.contributor.authorSolberg, Erling J.
dc.contributor.authorStoraas, Torstein
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-29T07:47:50Z
dc.date.available2011-03-29T07:47:50Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationEriksen, A., Wabakken, P., Zimmermann, B., Andreassen, H., Arnemo, J.M., Gundersen, H., Liberg, O., Linnell, J., Milner, J.M., Pedersen, H.C., Sand, H., Solberg, E.J, Storaas, T. (2011). Activity patterns of predator and prey. Animal behaviour. 80(2), 423-431en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-3472
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/134318
dc.descriptionThis is the postprint version of the article published in Animal behaviour. You can find the published article here: http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2010.11.011en_US
dc.description.abstractWe studied the simultaneous activity patterns of a breeding wolf, Canis lupus, pair and five adult moose, Alces alces, cows from April to November 2004 in a wolf territory in southeastern Norway. All study animals were GPS collared, and we used a total of 8297 fixes to analyse their temporal activity patterns. We examined the daily activity rhythm of the two species and how this varied seasonally through the study period, and investigated the association in activity patterns between the two species. Wolf activity peaked at dawn. The distance moved per time unit and the linearity of the movement were higher in wolves than in moose, but both species showed a decrease in these variables in June, coinciding with the denning and calving seasons. With the exception of the summer months when the activity of wolves and moose was limited by the raising of offspring, we found no correlation between the temporal activities of the two species. Hence, we did not find support for the hypothesis that the wolves and moose in Scandinavia have adjusted to each other’s activity patterns. We discuss the results in light of the relative density of the two species and the intensive human harvest of moose, and hypothesize that synchronicity of predator–prey activity patterns may be ratio dependent.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherAnimal Behaviouren_US
dc.subjectActivity patternen_US
dc.subjectalces alcesen_US
dc.subjectCanis lupusen_US
dc.subjectGPS-collaren_US
dc.subjectmooseen_US
dc.subjectpredation risken_US
dc.subjectpredator avoidanceen_US
dc.subjectwolfen_US
dc.titleActivity patterns of predator and prey : a simultaneous study of GPS-collared wolves and mooseen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Mathematics and natural science: 400::Zoology and botany: 480::Zoogeography: 486en_US
dc.source.pagenumber423-431en_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2010.11.011


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