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dc.contributor.authorStøen, Ole Gunnar
dc.contributor.authorOrdiz, Andres
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Alina
dc.contributor.authorLaske, Timothy G.
dc.contributor.authorKindberg, Jonas
dc.contributor.authorFröbert, Ole
dc.contributor.authorSwenson, Jon E.
dc.contributor.authorArnemo, Jon Martin
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-28T12:21:15Z
dc.date.available2016-01-28T12:21:15Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationStøen, O.-G., Ordiz Fernandez, A. A., Evans, A., Laske, T., Kindberg, J., Fröbert, O., . . . Arnemo, J. M. (2015). Physiological evidence for a human-induced landscape of fear in brown bears (Ursus arctos). Physiology and Behavior, 152(A), 244-248. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.09.030nb_NO
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2375129
dc.description.abstractHuman persecution is a major cause of mortality for large carnivores. Consequently, large carnivores avoid humans, but may use human-dominated landscapes by being nocturnal and elusive. Behavioral studies indicate that certain ecological systems are “landscapes of fear”, driven by antipredator behavior. Because behavior and physiology are closely interrelated, physiological assessments may provide insight into the behavioral response of large carnivores to human activity. To elucidate changes in brown bears' (Ursus arctos) behavior associated with human activity, we evaluated stress as changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in 12 GPS-collared, free-ranging bears, 7 males and 5 females, 3–11 years old, using cardiac-monitoring devices. We applied generalized linear regression models with HR and HRV as response variables and chest activity, time of day, season, distance traveled, and distance to human settlements from GPS positions recorded every 30 min as potential explanatory variables. Bears exhibited lower HRV, an indication of stress, when they were close to human settlements and especially during the berry season, when humans were more often in the forest, picking berries and hunting. Our findings provide evidence of a human-induced landscape of fear in this hunted population of brown bears.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherPhysiology & Behaviornb_NO
dc.relation.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S003193841530127X
dc.rightsNavngivelse-Ikkekommersiell-IngenBearbeidelse 3.0 Norge*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/no/*
dc.subjectBrown bearsnb_NO
dc.subjectUrsus arctosnb_NO
dc.subjectHeart ratenb_NO
dc.subjectHeart rate variabilitynb_NO
dc.subjectHuman disturbancenb_NO
dc.subjectWildlifenb_NO
dc.titlePhysiological evidence for a human-induced landscape of fear in brown bears (Ursus arctos)nb_NO
dc.typeJournal articlenb_NO
dc.typePeer reviewednb_NO
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Mathematics and natural science: 400::Zoology and botany: 480nb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber244-248nb_NO
dc.source.volume152nb_NO
dc.source.journalPhysiology & Behaviornb_NO
dc.source.issueAnb_NO
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.09.030


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Navngivelse-Ikkekommersiell-IngenBearbeidelse 3.0 Norge
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Navngivelse-Ikkekommersiell-IngenBearbeidelse 3.0 Norge