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dc.contributor.authorJahren, Torfinn
dc.contributor.authorStoraas, Torstein
dc.contributor.authorWillebrand, Tomas
dc.contributor.authorMoa, Pål Fossland
dc.contributor.authorHagen, Bjørn Roar
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-29T11:27:00Z
dc.date.available2016-11-29T11:27:00Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationJahren, T., Storaas, T., Willebrand, T., Moa, P. F., & Hagen, B.-R. (2016). Declining reproductive output in capercaillie and black grouse – 16 countries and 80 years. Animal Biology, 66(3-4), 363-400. doi:10.1163/15707563-00002514nb_NO
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2423421
dc.description.abstractDeclines in populations of capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) and black grouse (Lyrurus tetrix) have been reported from both Central Europe and the continuous boreal forests of Fennoscandia. While intensified land-use is assumed to be the underlying cause of these declines, the mechanisms are not yet understood. Predation is the proximate cause of mortality of eggs, chicks and adults throughout capercaillie and black grouse ranges, but the link between predation and habitat and/or climate change remains unclear. To investigate temporal trends in reproductive output of woodland grouse, we collated previously published and unpublished data of reproduction in capercaillie and black grouse throughout their ranges from 1930 to 2012. We show that, overall, reproductive success has decreased and stabilized at low levels in most regions whilst capercaillie reproductive output in Scotland is still declining. With today’s net reproduction, capercaillie and black grouse adult survival is too low to compensate for reproduction declines. Consequently, populations are expected to further decline unless reproductive performances improve. We put our findings in the context of changes in land use, climate and generalist predator numbers. By critically reviewing how these factors limit reproductive success in capercaillie and black grouse, we hope to shed light on the underlying mechanisms causing the decline. Our results imply that measures should be undertaken to reduce mortality of capercaillie and black grouse chicks and eggs. We suggest that future studies should aim to better understand which predators limit capercaillie and black grouse populations and how predation rates are mediated by continuously changing habitat and climate.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherBrillnb_NO
dc.subjectCapercaillienb_NO
dc.subjectClimatenb_NO
dc.subjectDeclinenb_NO
dc.subjectGrousenb_NO
dc.subjectLand usenb_NO
dc.subjectPredationnb_NO
dc.subjectReproduction successnb_NO
dc.subjectSurvivalnb_NO
dc.titleDeclining reproductive output in capercaillie and black grouse – 16 countries and 80 yearsnb_NO
dc.typeJournal articlenb_NO
dc.typePeer reviewednb_NO
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Mathematics and natural science: 400::Zoology and botany: 480nb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber363-400nb_NO
dc.source.volume66nb_NO
dc.source.journalAnimal Biologynb_NO
dc.source.issue3-4nb_NO
dc.identifier.doihttp://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/10.1163/15707563-00002514;jsessionid=6ImwgNI4wYV9uiIUgr2G8RgG.x-brill-live-02
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/15707563-00002514 OA


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